Adirondack Internal Medicine & Pediatrics

Pediatric Immunization Information

The content on this website is provided for informational purposes only. This site is not intended to substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) provides this link to the recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedules.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) provides this link to detailed information about the different vaccines available to patients, and the diseases they protect against.

For general information about common immunizations, click on the selections below:

DtaP – Combination vaccine for Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis
Hep A – Hepatitis A vaccine
Hep B – Hepatitis B vaccine
Hib – Haemophilus Influenzae Type b
HPV - Vaccine for Genital human papillomavirus (HPV)
Influenza Vaccines – Vaccines for influenza
IPV – Inactivated Polio Vaccine
Menactra – MCV4 vaccine for Meningococcal disease
MMR – Measles, Mumps & Rubella
Prevnar – Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
Rotavirus – Rotavirus vaccine
Varivax – Protects against Chicken Pox (Varicella)

IMPORTANT: The content and links provided on this website are for informational purposes only. The provided information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website, or at one of the websites to which we have provided a link.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.

 





 



DtaP – Combination vaccine for Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis

Diphtheria causes a thick covering in the back of the throat that can lead to breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure and possibly death.

Tetanus (Lockjaw) causes painful tightening of the muscles, usually all over the body. It can lead to “locking” of the jaw so the victim cannot open his mouth or swallow. Tetanus leads to death in 1 out of 10 cases.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) causes coughing spells so bad it is hard for infants to eat, drink or breathe. Spells can last for weeks. Pertussis can lead to pneumonia, seizures, brain damage and death.







 




Hep A – Hepatitis A vaccine

Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is usually spread by close personal contact and sometimes by eating food or drinking water containing HAV. Hepatitis A can cause mild flu-like illness, jaundice (yellow skin or eyes), severe stomach pains and diarrhea. People with hepatitis A often have to be hospitalized (up to about 1 person in 5). Sometimes, hepatitis A causes death (about 100 per year in the U.S.). A person who has hepatitis A can easily pass the disease to others within the same household.







 




Hep B – Hepatitis B vaccine

Hepatitus B virus (HBV) can cause short term (acute) illnesses that lead to loss of appetite, tiredness, pain in joints, muscles and stomach, diarrhea and vomiting and jaundice.

It can also cause long term (chronic) illness that leads to liver damage, liver cancer and death.







 




Hib – Haemophilus Influenzae Type b

Hib is a serious disease caused by bacteria that usually strikes children under the age of 5. Prior to Hib vaccine, Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis among children under 5.

Hib disease can also cause pneumonia, severe swelling in the throat, infections of the blood, joints, bones and covering of the heart.







 




HPV - Vaccine for Genital human papillomavirus (HPV)

Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually-transmitted virus in the United States. More than half of sexually active men and women are infected with HPV at some time in their lives. Most HPV infections don’t cause any symptoms, and go away on their own. But HPV can cause cervical cancer in women.







 




Influenza Vaccines – Vaccines for influenza

Influenza - Anyone can get influenza, but rates of infection are highest among children. For most people, it lasts only a few days. It can cause fever, cough, sore throat, headache, chills, fatigue, and muscle aches. Some people, such as infants, elderly, and those with certain health conditions, can get much sicker. Flu can cause high fever and pneumonia, and make existing medical conditions worse. It can cause diarrhea and seizures in children. On average, 226,000 people are hospitalized every year because of influenza and 36,000 die—mostly elderly. Influenza viruses are always changing. Because of this, influenza vaccines are updated every year, and an annual vaccination is recommended.

There are two types of seasonal influenza vaccine:

  • Inactivated influenza vaccine, sometimes called the “flu shot”, is given by injection.
  • Live Influenza vaccine (LAIV) contains live but attenuated (weakened) influenza virus. It is sprayed into the nostrils.




     


 




IPV – Inactivated Polio Vaccine

Polio is a potentially serious disease that can cause paralysis. IPV is an injection of dead polio virus. There is no risk of acquiring polio from the vaccine. It replaces the oral vaccine that was live and carried a rare possibility of causing the disease.


 




 




Menactra – MCV4 vaccine for Meningococcal disease

Meningococcal disease is a serious illness, caused by a bacteria. It is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children 2-18 years old in the United States. (Meningitis is an infection of fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord.) Meningococcal disease also causes blood infections.

About 2,600 people get meningococcal disease each year in the U.S. 10-15% of these people die, in spite of treatment with antibiotics. Of those who live, another 11-19% lose their arms or legs, become deaf, have problems with their nervous systems, become mentally retarded, or suffer seizures or strokes.


 




 




MMR – Measles, Mumps & Rubella

Measles virus causes rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation and fever. It may lead to ear infection, pneumonia, seizures, brain damage and even death.

Mumps virus causes fever, headache, and swollen glands. It can lead to deafness, meningitis, painful swelling of the testicles or ovaries and rarely, death.

Rubella (German Measles) causes rash, mild fever and arthritis (mostly in women). If a woman gets rubella while pregnant, she could have a miscarriage or her baby could be born with serious birth defects.

Your child could catch these diseases by being around someone who has them. They spread from person to person by air.







 




Prevnar – Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

Pneumococcal disease is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria, and can cause serious illness and death. Invasive pneumococcal disease is responsible for about 200 deaths each year among children under 5 years old. It is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States. It can also lead to other problems including pneumonia, deafness and brain damage. Children under 2 years old are at the highest risk for serious disease.

PCV13 protects against the 13 pneumococcal bacteria types that are responsible for most severe pneumococcal infections among children.


 




 




Rotavirus – Rotavirus vaccine


Rotavirus signs and symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting and fever. It can lead to dehydration, hospitalization (before rotavirus vaccine was used, up to about 70,000 per year) and death.


 




 




Varivax – Protects against Chicken Pox (Varicella)

A common childhood disease, usually mild, it can be serious, especially among infants and adults. It causes a rash, itching, fever and tiredness. It can lead to severe skin infection, scars, pneumonia, brain damage and death.









 

 

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